Pari Nadimi Gallery

254 Niagara Street

Toronto, Ontario

Canada M6J 2L8

info@parinadimigallery.com

Tel: (416) 591-6464

Please be advised that the gallery does not accept unsolicited submissions at this time. 

Hours:

Thursday - Saturday 12 - 5 PM

Or by appointment

perambulation02c.jpg

Joe Hambleton, Perambulations, 2018, video still.

Perambulation

Joe Hambleton

February 15 - March 30, 2019

Opening Reception: Friday, February 15, 6- 8pm

Pari Nadimi Gallery is pleased to present Perambulation a solo exhibition by Joe Hambleton

As we continue to adopt digital innovations, the separation between virtual and the real has progressively become more ambiguous. While algorithm-based processes are designed to make our lives easier, we are only beginning to comprehend how they modify the way we see, think and interact with the world. While this augmentation has generally been beneficial, our inability to see the long-term impact of these advancements is starting to become apparent. Perambulation dissects digital processes to gain a fundamental understanding of how they replicate the real and find the limits of their narrative potential.

 

Joe Hambleton chose to work with 3D animation because nearly all aspects of the software were designed to emulate the real. Indirect illumination algorithms such as ray tracing, photon mapping and ambient occlusion were intended to replicate human optics. To recreate many classic cinematography techniques, virtual cameras mimic the film gate size, focal length, aperture and shutter speed of physical cameras. To create lifelike animation, motion capture records the movements of a performer in the real world and applies them to an avatar in the virtual. While experimenting with these tools, he quickly realized that while they can replicate the real, they can also be pushed further to create unexpected results. Through experimentation he attempted to find the boundaries of the technology and the potential to create narrative devices unique to the medium.  

 

The results of these experiments had varying degrees of success. While he found the tools could both replicate and exceed their physical counterparts, there were often limitations in their application. Each small advancement forced him to question the process and whether there was any purpose in his intent. Hambleton concluded that he couldn't fully understand the work until it was completed and gained some distance from it. The frustration with this development began to seep into the narrative of the work. Conflicting feelings of progress, stagnation and failure were evoked in both the visuals and structure of each piece. Looking back on it now, he believes he's created a series of work that mirrors our naivety towards digital technology. It finds success in emulating our ability to push forward blindly for advancement's sake, without pause, concern or understanding on how it may ultimately change us.

 

Hambleton's work explores the narrative potential of new media in art. Influenced by his study of other media such as film, literature, and videogames, he hides the intent of his work deep within its structure and challenges the viewer to discover its obscured significance. His production techniques constantly evolve to match the concept of his work. From classic cinematography, to more modern compositing effects, computer programming and a range of animation techniques (stop-motion, 2D, 3D), he constantly pushes his understanding of time-based media to expand his vocabulary as an artist.

 

Joe Hambleton  (b.1982) currently lives in Toronto, where he teaches Digital Media and Art at York University, OCAD university, Centennial College, Toronto School of Art and the Liaison of Independent Film and Television. He is a graduate of the University of Windsor (BFA in Visual Arts) and York University (MFA in Visual Arts). He has been awarded grants from the Ontario Arts Council, Canada Council of the Arts and the Toronto Arts Council. His work has been shown across North and South America, Europe and Asia.

Artist thanks the Ontario Arts Council and the Toronto Arts Council for their support.

For press and other inquiries, please contact Pari Nadimi Gallery at (416) 591-6464 or via email at info@parinadimigallery.com